Technology and Obesity

There have been numerous debates about the pros and cons of technology and its effects on the world around us. For every lover of technology, there is someone out there cursing at his/her computer,  and stressing his/her hatred for the age of technological progression. Despite these differences in opinions, I think we can all agree technology has impacted our lives in one way or another.

The advancement of technology in modern society has obviously had its fair share of advantages. The abilities of iphones and computers today have surpassed all expectations. Having the power to simplify our lives through the use of manufactured devices is astounding yet troublesome. We rely on these technological safeties so much we are blind to the possible disadvantages that lie beneath the celebratory exterior.

While technology has proven to be helpful in so many different ways, it also poses several problems, one being the possible link to childhood obesity. 20 years ago kids could be seen out and about at all hours of the day maybe playing baseball at the sandlot or enjoying a game of hide-and-seek at the park . Nowadays kids are more likely to sit at home in front of the TV or Xbox for hours, only moving to adjust themselves on the couch or grab a snack. Scientists are concerned the lack of physical activity and the attraction of modern technology is causing kids to become overweight.

The question becomes whether it truly is the fault of technology in today’s society that is causing this issue to become so prominent or is it the faults of the individuals and their families? Do the cons outweigh pros that tag along with the ever-expanding world of technology?

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4 Responses to Technology and Obesity

  1. esf17 says:

    As a result of technology making things a hundred times easier for us, we as a society have brought ourselves in the habit of just reaching to our pockets or across the table to give us access to the world. Instead of walking over to a friends house down the street, our instinct is to text them or video chat them in some way. Also, as you mentioned with kids, the technological devices allow them to play internet games with friends without having to leave their bedrooms. I feel as though our age group lived through the transition of kids playing tag, manhunt, and hide-and-go-seek on a regular basis to always playing Call of Duty and Halo on video game systems. I hope science and other resources can figure out a way to limit to obesity problem in this country on children, and help them control their addiction to technology while gaining an appreciation for physical exercise.

  2. esf17 says:

    As a result of technology making things a hundred times easier for us, we as a society have brought ourselves in the habit of just reaching to our pockets or across the table to give us access to the world. Instead of walking over to a friends house down the street, our instinct is to text them or video chat them in some way. Also, as you mentioned with kids, the technological devices allow them to play internet games with friends without having to leave their bedrooms. I feel as though our age group lived through the transition of kids playing tag, manhunt, and hide-and-go-seek on a regular basis to always playing Call of Duty and Halo on video game systems. I hope science and other resources can figure out a way to limit the obesity problem in this country on children, and help them control their addiction to technology while gaining an appreciation for physical exercise.
    The pros and cons of technological use are very evident and will have a major effect on our society in the very near future. The issue will be, do we increase technology to the point where physical exercise would be limited, or do we some way have to figure out a perfect balance between both things in order to have an efficient society and healthy individuals. That, my friend, is the million-dollar issue that those in command must figure out.

  3. Miss Jackson says:

    When discussing the cause of the rise of obesity, neither technology nor family is more to blame for this problem. Instead, the cause of obesity is more of a combination of technology, fast food restaurant chains, and lack of school and family responsibility. Like you said before, the inventions of computers and video games have negatively contributed to obesity. Over the summer, I hardly saw the children in my neighborhood outside running and playing together for hours as I did in my childhood. Instead, I would see children taking their video games and game controllers over to each other’s houses to play them with one another. Not only were these children missing out on enjoying those long warm summer days outdoors with friends, they were also not getting the physical activity that they need.

    However, we must remember that video games in themselves do not make children fat. The amount and type of food that they eat does. Fast food restaurants continue to sell greasy high caloric food and because the food is cheap, fast, and convenient, parents continue to buy it for themselves and their children. Schools continue to have unhealthy lunch options for their students to eat. For example, my high school sells French fries, cheeseburgers, chicken nuggets and candy to students during every lunch period. Although school administrators know that this food is unhealthy, they continue to sell it because they know that students will buy it. Fast food restaurants and schools need to take responsibility for the food that they are serving children and adults and recognize the role that it is playing in obesity. Also parents and guardians need to recognize the harm that they are causing themselves and their children by constantly allowing them to eat unhealthy food.

    In technology and obesity, technology seems to be more beneficial than harmful. In general, it has had such a life-changing and positive impact on our lives and it is not the sole cause of obesity. Because of this I feel as though the pros outweigh the cons concerning the issue of technology and obesity.

  4. Ferron says:

    It’s not technology alone that’s causing obesity but, as Miss Jackson, said, a combination of things. To play devil’s advocate, what is the difference if I sit on a couch and watch TV than sit in a chair and read? They both require me to sit still and not be active for a given time. In this, it’s evident that something else is a play here. I’m not qualified to get into the complexities of obesity but, I don’t think it’s technology alone.

    Also, in your post you said that we’re blind to technology’s disadvantages. Though I agree with this, I think it’s a bit less radical. I’ve read posts about how sitting for an extended period of time is detrimental to your health, but I sit for hours anyway. I know the risks but choose to ignore them in order to do something I enjoy. Maybe this is how people react, assuming they’ve heard of the disadvantages.

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