Monthly Archives: November 2010

Internet Lingo and Academic Prose

In doing research for the Future of Literacy project, I keep thinking about the gap that exists between the writing done on the internet and the writing submitted in school. It’s only going to continue-what started off as chat sessions … Continue reading

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Miller–The Coming Apocalypse

I realize that not everyone might have read this particular article, but I wanted to ask a question pertaining to something that Miller states. He discusses writing as a tool for self-expression, and how today, students have access to many … Continue reading

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Stimulating thought and producing meaningful work

In Miller’s article on “The Coming Apocalypse” he challenges the way institutions impart knowledge and stimulate thought. He argues that while our world is becoming more global and interactive, our teaching system has remained in the stone age, with kids … Continue reading

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Why aren’t we stimulated by deep attention?

When discussing the reasons why individuals are able to maintain motivation to play video games Hayles states, “Stimulation works best… when it is associated with feelings of autonomy, competence, and relatedness”. Assuming this claim to be true, why is the … Continue reading

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Media in the future of education

As children are spending more and more time watching TV, playing video games, and using the internet, where will reading fall when we become teachers.  Will a switch to media use be necessary in the classroom?  What kind of reading … Continue reading

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Miller’s Apocalypse

It is true that English assignments in schools aren’t keeping up with the changing world.  Forget English assignments; the most modern news I received in history classes took me up to the end of World War II before we ran … Continue reading

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Hybrid Classrooms for Generation M

Hayles defines “deep attention” as the “cognitive” ability to concentrate on one particular task at a time, often for long periods of time.  Contrastingly, “hyper attention” is the skill that allows a person to mentally multi-task, “switching focus rapidly” on … Continue reading

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justin bieber memoir meme

I mentioned something in class about this link, and so if you’re inclined to absurdism and internet humor, here you go: http://www.buzzfeed.com/mjs538/the-15-best-quotes-from-justin-biebers-autobiogra

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Gin, Television and Cognitive Surplus

Hey everyone! If you’re curious about the idea from Clay Shirky that Miller references in “Reading in Slow Motion,” you can read more about it here: http://www.herecomeseverybody.org/2008/04/looking-for-the-mouse.html There’s an updated, more polished version in his book, Cognitive Surplus, but the concepts … Continue reading

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Too what extent can we reasonably read in slow motion while tendering to our other undergrad learning needs as well?

I am very excited and intrigued by Miller’s teaching philosophy, but it certainly raises a lot of applicability questions.  It seems like there are myriad positives to reading only one text for a class, allowing for the expansion of thought into … Continue reading

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